Tanzania is an East African country situated just south of the Equator. Tanzania is surrounded by many lakes, Lake Victoria to the north, Lake Nyasa to the south and southwest, Lake Tanganyika to the west and by the Indian Ocean to the east.

Tanzania has been spared the internal strife that has blighted many African states but domestic stability has not translated into economic prosperity for Tanzanians with 67.9% of the population living below the official poverty line. Many of its people live below the world bank poverty line. Most people rely on small-scale farming in rural areas, but around 35% of the population do not have enough food to eat.

  • Population

    57.31 million

  • Global Food security index score

    Considers the core issues of affordability availability and quality across 113 countries where 1 is the top scoring country. 98/113

  • Percentage of people who lack access to safe drinking water

    50%

  • Percentage of people who do not have access to improved sanitation, such as toilets or latrines

    66%

  • Prevalence of undernourishment

    32%

  • Number of primary aged children out of school

    An estimated 2 million children between the ages of 7 and 13 years are out of school.

  • Child malnutrition

    42% of children under five in Tanzania suffer from chronic malnutrition and 16 percent are underweight

Signpost started working in Tanzania in 2019 when we partnered alongside the Vine Trust and the African inland church Tanzania to address water-related health concerns in the Island communities of Lake Victoria.

WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene) is one of Signpost’s four strands of work and Tanzania is in crisis when it comes to Water and Sanitation. Only 57% of Tanzania’s population of 57 million have access to safe water, and only 30% of Tanzania’s population have access to improved sanitation.

Tanzania is surrounded by many large lakes which offer an abundance of water but many of the lakes including Lake Victoria are polluted due to the inadequate infrastructure of sewage and water systems.

For most people on the islands, water for drinking, cooking and cleaning is only accessible from the heavily contaminated lake water. Though there is knowledge of waterborne illnesses, without the resources to treat the water, community members are often left with little option but to use it. As a result, there is a high prevalence of waterborne illness recorded as a direct consumption of contaminated water sources.

We hope that our WASH projects will implement the provision of water-treatment solutions to island households improving water, sanitation and hygiene.

What We Do

Find out more about our four areas of work which all harness the power of education enabling people to reach their potential and build a better future.

Learn more

Get Involved

Would you like to contribute to our work?

Get involved

Latest News

All News
  • 15th July 2020

    COVID-19 in the countries we work in overseas – update 18

    At Signpost International we want to continue to keep you up to date with the current Coronavirus situation in the countries and communities we work in. At the time of publishing (12.30pm on Wednesday 15th July 2020) this is the current situation in the countries we work in. Uganda There are…

    Read more
  • 9th July 2020

    Signpost International Statement

    ‘Loving your neighbour as yourself’ is one of the principles of our faith and a shared theme for many Christian charities. When asked “And who is my neighbour?”, Jesus told the story of the Good Samaritan, who went out of his way to help a person in trouble, the victim…

    Read more
  • 8th July 2020

    Dundee Virtual Kiltwalk – Thank you!

    We are delighted to share with you the final amount raised from the virtual Dundee Kiltwalk that took place at the weekend, Team Signpost International raised £5,126.41. This total includes the very generous donations that many of you gave, the extremely generous boost from the Hunter Foundation and Gift Aid.…

    Read more